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20121112
20121120
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
in common with sam walton than steve jobs? >> you know, sam walton is somebody who i have read his autobiography. i've thought a lot about him. and i think there is-- there was a lot to admire in the way that he started wa-mart and-- he was a customer-obsessed guy. >> rose: and he believed in low margins and huge volume. >> he really, what i think he believed in is trying to figure out what customers wanted and trying to figure out how to give it to them. certainly one of the things customers want is efficient operations so you can afford to lower price. internally i think it is easy to lower prices. it's hard to be able to afford to lower price. so there's a lot of hard work involved in charging less. >> you're also like steve in that you are a founder operator. i mean you founded the ompany. steve founded apple and left and came back. you have been there from the beginning. and you stay with it. >> absolutely. and i stay with it because it's fun. i love invention. i love my teammates. i like working on part of a team where we all count on each other. it's a stimulating environmen
for the c.e.o.'s office. but instead, sinofsky is out and steve ballmer remains the c.e.o. >> the more broad implication is, windows 8 was just released. this is a product that is supposed to change the future of microsoft, change its fortunes, and now the person behind its development is leaving. that's an ominous sign for investors. >> reporter: another troubling sign is the explosive growth of tablet computers and smartphones, stealing traditional desktop computer sales and the $75 licensing fee microsoft receives for every windows p.c. sold. >> microsoft's business model is just fundamentally broken for a mobile age, and that's not something someone like a steven sinofsky leading an engineering team on windows can fix. >> reporter: the stock reaction was negative. microsoft shares fell to their lowest price since january. sinofsky will be replaced by two women who worked with him. he's the second high-level executive to leave a technology giant in as many weeks. the head of apple's iphone software unit left in a management shake-up late last month. >> susie: want more evidence that a hou
the general's former spokesman retired colonel steve boylan told abc the affair began then, after he had left the army which strictly for bids adultery. >> this all started about two months after he was in the c.i.a. as the director and just so you know it alsonded about four months ago. he deeply hurt the family. he knows that. he acknowledges it. right now his whole focus is going to be geared towards taking care of the family and getting through this. >> brown: it's been widely reported that the affair was uncovered during an f.b.i. invtigaon prompted b 37-year-old jill kelly of tampa, florida. a friend of the petraeus family. the general's former associates insist there was no romantic involvement between them. even so according to news accounts, kelly began getting threatening emails from broadwell. the f.b.i. started investigating last summer and turned up evidence of the petraeus-broadwell affair. that in turn raised questions of a possible security breach. intelligence officials say the justice department informed national intelligence director james clapper last week on election day.
montana's 100-year-old corrupt practices act. this was a case that you argued personally. steve bullock is the state attorney general. what does this case mean though for montana specifically? >> it was over 100 years ago. it was l906, in a local newspaper that said the greatest living issue confronting us today is whether the corporations shall control the people or the people shall control the corporations. we did have a historof really corporate dominance in all of our electoral processes, and montanans took it back. it was average people that came together and said, "no, we want to make sure that individuals are deciding who represents us and not large interests." >> this is western traditions partnership vs. attorney general of the state of montana. >> ryssdal: what the case turned into, though, was montana openly challenging the u.s. supreme court over citizens united. remember, citizens allowed outside groups to spend unlimited amounts of money independent of candidates. the court said outside spending does not corrupt. bullock disagreed. >> independent expenditures would corrupt
, and people have said it's very helpful. >> reporter: steve horwitz sells a broad variety of medical marijuana products in his south denver store, ganja gourmet. >> there are all kinds of chocolates and cookies and brownies. >> reporter: his is just one of 500 such dispensaries which have opened over the last four years, ever since colorado started allowing stores to sell the drug for medical uses. since then, a large market has flourished, and more than 100,000 residents now carry physician-recommended cards allowing them to buy the drug. but passage of a ballot initiative known as "amendment 64" will likely take retail marijuana to a whole new level, since presumably anyone who can now buy alcohol will be allowed to buy the drug. horwitz said almost as soon as the votes were counted last week, he began to hear from potential customers. >> and then all day long, the phone was ringing off the hook. they're pot tourists. they want to come to colorado and they want to do like they do in amsterdam. >> reporter: but those would-be high fliers probably shouldn't start booking plane tickets yet. hor
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)